Lord of the Flies, Quote Analysis

Chapter 4 of Lord of the Flies is an important chapter of the book. It includes some key turning points of the plot and shows different major developments of the characters. It this essay, 3 quotes concerning theme, importance and irony in chapter four will be analysed.

In chapter 4 Golding visualises the style of savagery in pages 79 and 80 by describing Jack’s ‘brand-new face’. “He made one cheek and one eye-socket white, then he rubbed red over the other half of his face and slashed a black bar of charcoal throughout from best ear to left jaw.”

Golding intentionally explains Jack’s face again, even though he had currently explained the modifications concerning his face. By re-describing Jack’s savage like face, the author wants to emphasise the constantly more important getting style of savagery at this moment in the book. As the memory of an adult regulated civilisation disappears, the savage like behaviour increases. Jack’s unnaturally coloured face also resembles his will to hunt, to eliminate, to destruct.

Jack’s character and his look are unifying as his face and character slowly change into an uncontrollable, savage like beast. Moreover, his brand-new face’s authority is right away shown in the lines following the description of his face, in which the other are following his order to get him a coco-nut. Society as an illusion is nicely demonstrated on page 75 which states “They had actually built castles at the bar of the little river. These castles were about one foot high and were embellished with shells, withered flowers, and intriguing stones.”

This quote is clearly clarifying the reader that society on the island is dead or an ancient memory at least. The withered flowers on the castle symbolise drained life, when one would see the castle as society, which was originally flourishing as it was beautifully decorated with flowers. Nevertheless, at this point, the flowers more seem to look like a thick layer of dead weeds, which suggest the lack of care and regard that has actually been shown to the upkeep of the castle and in this contrast, society.

Not only does the castle look abandoned and not-taken-care-of, it is just a few lines far from total damage as it is destroyed by Roger and Maurice on the next page. From that point onwards, society based upon structure and logical thinking has completely collapsed down, burying the principals of their previous world. The quote of Ralph on page 85 “They let the bloody fire out.” can be taken in by the reader in a really ironical way. This is because of various reasons. Firstly, one must ask himself the concern: ‘Who is they?’

After all, Ralph had rather a protagonist in the book. If anybody needs to be held responsible for the dozing of the fire, one of the most likely would have been Ralph himself. Secondly, he was the first one to reach the top, suggesting that if anyone might have been delegated letting the fire out it is, again, Ralph. The paradox continues as Ralph went intensely red after the occasion had actually happened. The actual fire may have been discharged however the fire like anger awoke inside Ralph since of the dozing of the fire.

Paradoxically, despite the fact that at the start of the book the children cherished their fire, as if it was their only way of enduring, yet it is the fire that is disregarded triggering them to lose out on a possible rescue. Conclusionally, the quotes “He made one cheek and one eye-socket white, then he rubbed red over the other half of his face and slashed a black bar of charcoal across from best ear to left jaw.” (pages 79 and 80), “They had developed castles at the bar of the little river.

These castles were about one foot high and were decorated with shells, withered flowers, and fascinating stones.” (page 75) and “They let the bloody fire out.” (page 85) illustrate the author’s objectives to reveal the omnipresence of the theme savagery and the way, which is frequently clarified by the usage of importance and paradox. The author has actually picked to clarify this through symbolism and paradox, to slowly make the reader more aware of the deeper thought of the book, war.

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