Lennie Small in Of Mice and Men

Lennie Small in Of Mice and Men

All journeys have a secret location of which the tourist is uninformed. In John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Male, Lennie emerges as a very static but impactful character throughout the novella who has no idea how his journey will end. The story happens after the Great Anxiety in the 1930s, concentrating on the journey of George Milton and Lennie Small, 2 pals in the state of California. Lennie and his pal George have just gotten new jobs on a ranch after fleing from their previous location of work due to an accident as a repercussion of Lennie’s child-like mentality. Now on their way to Soledad in hopes of a fresh start, their brand-new occupation as labour workers brings them closer to fulfilling their dream to one day purchase and survive on their own farm together. Lennie has several characteristics that define his overall childish character, consisting of being dependent, being forgetful, and being naïve.
First off, Lennie exhibits the characteristic of relying, much as a kid constantly counting on someone for assistance and support. Lennie counts on George to get him out of disputes. This is shown when George is referring to the conflict that took place in Weed and he states to Lennie that “you do bad things and I got ta get you out” (6 ). Lennie attempts to feel some girl’s gown however she errors it for a hostile relocation and runs away. Due to this, George needs to get Lennie far from the issue so that the townsfolk looking for Lennie would not find him. This verifies Lennie’s dependency on George as he requires him to get out of problems that he unconsciously creates. Lennie is likewise reliant on George for consistent peace of mind and to supply a sensation of comfort. He continuously asking George to recite the story of their dream to own a farm. For instance, when the males have opted for the night in the forest area around the Salinas River, Lennie bugs George to hear the story of their dream and George states “you get a kick outa that, don’t you?” (7 ). This demonstrates how much Lennie enjoys George informing him this story even though it is clear that he has heard it lot of times previously. Both these circumstances plainly reveal that Lennie is not an independent individual and is greatly dependent on George. Near the beginning of the book, when describing the conflict in Weed, George talks about how Lennie enters dispute and he is the one to get him out of it. Later on, in the very same chapter, Lennie nags George about informing the story of their farm dream to him since he gets a sensation of reassurance and mental comfort, thus verifying that Lennie depends on George. In all fairness, George and Lennie may not even be taking a trip together if Lennie were not so dependent. This reinforces the bond of trust between the 2 since George looks after Lennie due to his dependent frame of mind. Lennie puts his faith in George much like kids put faith in their guardians, making this trait fitting for Lennie’s total childish personality.
Secondly, Lennie is absent-minded, a trait typically seen in children as they tend to let go of information rather quickly. At the start of the book, Lennie constantly asks “where we goin’ George” (3 ). He constantly continues to ask the concern despite being told by George that they are on their method to the ranch for their brand-new tasks. This reveals the reader how even the easiest pieces of information pass cleanly though Lennie’s head. Likewise, throughout his conversation with the stable dollar, Crooks, who invites Lennie into his shed and talks to him about his lonely unpaid to the fact that his racial background specifies him as a castaway. Lennie does not seem to acknowledge anything stated by Crooks, who understands that he can speak with Lennie without any fear of the discussion being exposed as Lennie “couldn’t remember it anyways” (35 ). Throughout their conversation, when Scoundrels pauses for quick moment, Lennie starts speaking about puppies, because he can not remember what Crooks has said, which is totally out of context. This conveys to the reader that Lennie clearly stops working to maintain any information that other characters attempt to communicate to him, as soon as again showing the presence of Lennie’s forgetful nature. Lennie’s forgetful nature is substantial in the story due to the fact that it enables the reader to acquire a much better understanding of the steady buck. Crooks’s would never have felt comfortable informing Lennie about his life if Lennie were to retain whatever said to him. All along the story, Lennie’s forgetfulness troubles George since Lennie continuously fails to remember that bad things occur whenever he pets something soft and fragile. For instance, Curley’s wife is eliminated by Lennie since of his tendency to quickly forget pieces of details. Young kids are forgetful all the time, when again making this point fitting for Lennie’s overarching childish character.
Lastly, Lennie is naïve, quite like a child. This can be seen when George is speaking with Slim about the circumstance in Weed that transpired as an effect of Lennie’s Naivety. George talks about how Lennie “seen this woman in a red gown. [] He wishes to touch ever’thing he likes. Simply wants to feel it. So he connects to feel this red gown an’ the woman lets out a squawk, which gets Lennie all blended, and he holds on” (21 ). This informs the reader that Lennie ignores how the lady would react to him touching her dress, therefore proving him to be naïve. Another event where Lennie’s naïve frame of mind is conveyed is when Curley’s spouse’s welcomes Lennie to come touch her hair as it is really soft. Lennie, being uninformed of his strength, rubs it a little too approximately, making her uneasy. She madly screams at him to stop, that makes him panic, and tighten his grip as “She had a hard time violently under his hands [] he shook her [] and her body tumbled like a fish [] then she was still, for Lennie had broken her neck” (45 ). Even then, Lennie is still unaware of the truth that she is dead. These events reveal that Lennie is uninformed of social requirements and likewise of his own physical strength. Lennie’s naivety is a very substantial part of the plot as it is the root of all conflict. The 2 guys have to abandon their jobs in Weed and get away as a result of a problem triggered by Lennie’s naivety. Later in the story, a comparable conflict occurs when Lennie accidently eliminates Curley’s other half, ultimately leading to the death of Lennie at the hands of George. The conflict that happened in Weed when Lennie touches the Lady’s dress without indicating that he has any idea of what her response would be informs the reader that he is certainly a naïve character. Children are also naïve due to their undeveloped understanding and comprehending similar to Lennie who has a total childish state of mind in this story
In conclusion, Lennie Small is a childish guy based on George for help throughout dispute and for constant psychological reassurance, not able to keep in mind simple pieces of info that other characters attempt to inform him, and naïve because he is obviously uninformed of societal standards and of his own physical strength. After running away from the cattle ranch because he eliminated Curley’s partner, Lennie goes to the spot near the Salinas River. George finds him there and chooses to shoot Lennie. He believes that it is what is best for Lennie since he knows that Curley will abuse Lennie prior to eliminating him. George desires his friend to pass away painlessly therefore he shoots Lennie while reciting the story of their farm dream one last time to comfort Lennie in his last minutes. The impact of these traits can plainly be seen throughout the book as Lennie’s childish personality triggers the men to change jobs and makes George act parental, and also results in Lennie’s death at the hands of his friend in the end.

Bibliography:
Steinbeck, John. Of Mice and Guy. New York: Bantam, 1971. Print.

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