Lennie Of Mice and Men — Quotes With Page Number

Lennie Of Mice and Men– Estimates With Page Number

In the novel, Of Mice and Male, by John Steinbeck, the author shows Lennie through a series of incidents and interactions with other characters in the book.

The author explains several of Lennie’s attributes, such as his huge physical stature or child-like attitude, however focuses mainly on Lennie’s mental handicap, and his uncomfortable behavior as a result of this drawback. Lennie, one of the two protagonists, is essentially depicted as being forgetful, accident-prone, and obedient.

Lennie Small Prices Estimate

ennie Of Mice and Men appears to have the mind of a six-year-old; as an outcome, he is absent-minded and often needs to be advised of things. During their trek to Soledad, Lennie asks his pal

“where are we going, George?”

Of Mice and Guy, by John Steinbeck, Lennie Of Mice and Guy, Page 4

George reminds Lennie of the

“bad things Lennie had performed in Weed”

Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck, Lennie Of Mice and Guy, Page 4

and how the guys there had hunted them throughout the county. All of a sudden, a light of understanding appears on Lennie’s, and he blew up triumphantly

“I remember that now.”

Of Mice and Male, by John Steinbeck, Lennie Of Mice and Men, Page 5

Lennie’s triumphal reaction in remembering the occasions that caused him and George to leave from Weed suggests his lapse of memory. Prior to reaching the ranch in Soledad, George instructs Lennie to

“simply stand there and not state anything”

Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck, Lennie Of Mice and Men, Page 6

” if the boss asks him questions. However, upon getting here on the cattle ranch Lennie forgets George’s guidelines and talk with the boss, but instantly he recognizes his mistake and

“drops his head in pity at having actually forgotten.”

Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck, Lennie Of Mice and Guy, Page 22

In the novel, Lennie is not just absent-minded, but also accident-prone. After being introduced and “questioned” by the manager, George relies on Lennie and states

“so you weren’t gon na state a word. Damn near lost us the task, and I got to talk the boss out of it.”

Of Mice and Guy, by John Steinbeck, Lennie Of Mice and Men, Page 23

The difficulty Lennie causes upon very first getting to the ranch represents him as an individual who is accident-prone.

In the city of Weed, Lennie curiously feels the “red dress” of a girl who later accuses him of rape. Although he did not damage the woman, the commotion he produces in Weed highlights on his accident-prone quality. The incident where Lennie accidentally “crushes” Curley’s hand further recommends Lennie’s accidental characteristic, which almost gets him and George “canned.”

Since Lennie has the mind just of a six-year-old, he is extremely loyal. On their method to Soledad, George and Lennie take a break on a hill. George discovers that Lennie has a dead mouse, and shouts to him “provide me that mouse!” Lennie reluctantly reaches into his pocket, however at the noise of George snapping his fingers he obediently lays

“the mouse in George’s hand.”

Of Mice and Guy, by John Steinbeck, Lennie Of Mice and Male, Page 9

Through this basic interaction the author relays to readers that Lennie is very loyal to George’s commands. Following Curley’s appearance, George instructs Lennie to

“have absolutely nothing to do with Curley,”

Of Mice and Guy, by John Steinbeck, Lennie Of Mice and Male, Page 29

because he is the boss’s boy and smells like difficulty. Lennie responds “sure George,” and follows his friend’s order. By abiding by George’s order, Lennie demonstrates his obedience.

The unique partly revolves around one of the 2 protagonists, Lennie. He includes many characteristics: physical, psychological, and psychological. Nevertheless, the 3 qualities listed above are mostly used to represent his character. These qualities are repeatedly pointed out throughout the novel, which represents their importance.

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