Corruption in Orwell’s 1984

Corruption in Orwell’s 1984

In George Orwell’s “Animal Farm,” Napoleon shows how poor leadership can corrupt a society. Napoleon was a great leader at one point, but as quickly as the power went to his head, he started to make poor decisions. Napoleon and his fans, that were pigs, thought that considering that they were the leaders in Animal Farm they were better than the other animals. When the management went to their heads, they chose the changes the rules. The brand-new rule specified, “All the animals are equal, but some animals [Pigs] are more equal than others” (Orwell 90). Prior to the animals took the management to their heads, they were valuable and thought the all animals were together as one. They rejoiced and sang together decreeing that they were the best, “Beasts of England, monsters of Ireland, Monsters of every land and climate, Hearken to my happy tidings Of the golden future time” (Orwell 12).
Following management, Animal Farm shows a good deal of how greed can corrupt a society. Although the animals were level with each other, the Pigs felt the need to take all the supplies from the harvest. Given that they were “higher” in rank and smarter than the other animals, the Pigs believed that they need to have all the milk and apples to make them “smarter”; “Our sole item in taking these things is to protect our health. Milk and apples (this has actually been shown by Science, pals) includes substances absolutely to the well-being of a pig. (Orwell 35-36) Likewise, when Napoleon was trading with other farms he tricks them into giving him more cash. He utilizes two farms that are against each other and attempts to see which farm can provide him the most money. Napoleon had in the lawn “a pile of wood which were stacked ten years earlier” (Orwell 77), was “well seasoned” (Orwell 77), and “both Mr. Pilkington and Mr. Frederick were anxious to buy it.” (Orwell 77) Napoleon is a prime example of how greediness goes straight to one’s head.
When there is both leadership and greed in a society, there can also be possessiveness. After which the animals take over the farm, the Pigs start to take control over the entire farm. Gradually the Pigs start to end up being more possessive, primarily Napoleon. The Pigs were all in charge together, however Napoleon wished to take all of the power. When Snowball tried to assist the farm by producing the styles of a windmill, Napoleon ruins them purposefully so the farm will not let Snowball remain in control. Napoleon did not like his ideas, “nevertheless, he got here suddenly to analyze the plans.”(Orwell 50) Napoleon ensures no one is around and,” he lifted his leg, urinated over the plans, and left without uttering a word” (Orwell 50). Napoleon wished to have all the power, and by doing so he would remove anything and/or anyone to get what he desires.
In Animal Farm, Orwell not only shows, but shows how the traits of management, greed, and possessiveness can corrupt a society. The primary individual then reveals all of these characteristics is Napoleon. He is ruthless and wants to have everything for himself. Since of his actions, he was triggering the animal farm’s destruction and fall. For many years that passed, more animals began to pass away and food becomes limited. This was all due to the fact that of the bad leadership. George Orwell proves that with poor management or if there are poor leaders in the society, there will be corruption and no peace.

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